About Zircon

Hindu poets tell of the Kalpa Tree, the ultimate gift to the gods, a glowing tree covered in gemstone fruit with leaves of Zircon. Zircon has long played a supporting role to more well-known gemstones, often stepping in as an understudy when they were unavailable.

In the middle ages, Zircon was said to aid sleep, bring prosperity, and promote honor and wisdom in its owner. The name probably comes from the Persian word ‘zargun’, which means ‘gold-colored’, which is the most common color of Zircon available.

Natural Zircon today suffers on account of the similarity of its name to cubic zirconia, the laboratory-grown Diamond imitation. Many people are unaware that there is a beautiful natural gemstone called Zircon.

Zircon occurs in a wide range of colors including blue, green, yellow, brown, reddish brown, colorless and everything in between. For many years the most popular was the colorless variety, which looks more like Diamond than any other natural stone because of its brilliance and dispersion.

Today the most popular color is Blue Zircon, which is considered an alternative birthstone for December. Most Blue Zircon is of a pastel blue, but some exceptional gems have a bright blue color.

Zircon has a hardness on the Mohs Hardness Scale of 6.5-7.5.

Zircon is mined in Cambodia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Myanmar, Australia, and other countries.

Zircon is one of the heaviest gemstones, which means that it will look smaller than other varieties of the same weight. Zircon jewelry should be stored carefully because although it is relatively hard, Zircon can suffer from abrasion and the facets can be chipped. Dealers often wrap Zircons in individual twists of paper so that they will not knock against each other in a parcel.

The wide variety of colors of Zircon, its rarity, and its relatively low cost make it a popular collector’s stone. Collectors enjoy the search for all possible colors and variations.